Wheezy by Easter?

Now this would be nice to wake up to on Easter Sunday (along with a few colored Easter eggs and maybe a chocolate rabbit or two): According to a The H Open article at the end of last week, Debian 7.0, known to all of us as Wheezy (and, in its CrunchBang manifestation, as Waldorf shortly thereafter), could be ready as early as Easter.

As it stands on Palm Sunday, which is today (yep, 13 years of Catholic school from K-12 are not lost on me), there are 64 outstanding bugs to be wrapped up, so if the cat herding goes as planned, we could have a new version in a week.

So if we get Wheezy sometime during Easter week, it would be great. And with Wheezy, not too much later would come Waldorf; then we’ll all get to start working toward (and waiting for) Jessie, which would be Debian 8.0 (and, of course, following Debian’s lead, CrunchBang’s Muppet Show alter ego would be . . . Janice (and the interesting conversation about this Muppet character on this CrunchBang forum thread here).

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and has just started developing software at Redwood Digital Research (RDR), a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment. RDR is based in Felton, California, USA.

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Hanging with the outlaws

[NOTE: This is reposted from the Larry the Free Software Guy blog item today. Because it mentions CrunchBang (however marginally), it runs also as today’s Larry the CrunchBang Guy item.]

Sitting at my desk at the newspaper a week ago, I got a tweet from CrunchBang’s lead developer Philip Newborough: They’re talking about you on #LO.

Hmmm. It’s not the first time I’ve been talked about, and thanks to the heads-up from Philip, I got to sit in on a taping of Linux Outlaws No. 302, which is now out in the wider world here. The quote that gave me worldwide renown, at least on Linux Outlaws, was from a recent blog about Ubuntu: “The gravity with which Canonical pulls Ubuntu further from its original FOSS orbit is nothing short of tragic.”

Linux Outlaws, according to their page, talks about anything that runs on Linux, about open source software on other platforms and many other things. Dan Lynch and Fabian Scherschel are the hosts of Linux Outlaws, and the pair go into great detail on the news and other happenings in the Linux/FOSS world. As described on the site, listening to the show is very much like listening to two friends sitting in a pub, having fun and talking about things they find interesting — and thanks to the modern miracle of podcasts, it’s like you’re there with them, pint in hand.

There is gratuitous swearing and neither Dan nor Fabian pull any punches when describing shortcomings or stupidity, intentional or not, and calling people out for it. Ranting seems to be par for the course — again, in a good way, and Dan tends to be low-key and methodical in his analysis while Fabian positions himself on opposite side of that spectrum, sometimes redlining the needle on the rant tachometer. It’s all thought-provoking and informative, punctuated with humor and hilarity.

Of course, while Linux Outlaws is not for the faint of heart, it’s still clearly worth a listen.

I haven’t had a chance to listen to the edited podcast yet, and as I write this, they’re doing the live taping of Episode 303 — and I find myself having to explain to my colleagues what I’m laughing at (long story). However, the live broadcast for 302 was incredibly entertaining, and they have earned a regular fan here.

Keep up the great work, guys!

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and has just started developing software at Redwood Digital Research (RDR), a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment. RDR is based in Felton, California, USA.

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Member of The Internet Defense League

Preaching to the choir

Yours truly gave the talk yesterday at the Felton Linux Users Group meeting at 1 p.m. at the solar-powered Felton Fire Station (how Californian is that?) on the topic of “An Intro to CrunchBang,” which is the best distro you’ve never heard of. It’s not a new presentation — to be honest, I updated the slides from the SCALE Birds of a Feather meetup, which were updated from the slides from the talk I gave last year (and will submit again this year) at Linux Fest Northwest — and it was very well received, though a little long in the tooth, so to speak.

There were about 15 folks in attendance — a record since we moved the meetings to Sundays (and, finally, I’m able to attend meetings of a group I co-founded) — and it looks like we’ll be staying with the second-Sunday-of-the-month schedule from here on in.

In any case, CrunchBang was very well received during the talk, and rather than talk and then field questions, I let folks who had questions just jump in during the talk, which provided some interesting discussions and enhanced the presentation. The best example of this was one of the Felton LUG members is a Fluxbox user and he gave a much better answer than I did on the difference between desktop environments and window managers (an answer, incidentally, from which I gleaned a lot of information for future presentations).

Of special interest to some of the folks at the meeting were both Conky and Openbox, and lengthy discussions ensued on both topics. I had a chance to discuss our wide range of Conky setups in the forum (which led to a good segue to talking about how great the CrunchBang forum is), and showing off some of what you can do with Openbox.

It was a good warmup for Linux Fest Northwest, which will feature a CrunchBang table for the second year in a row, and which will hopefully also feature a presentation about CrunchBang if the LFNW gods smile upon my submission in the Call for Papers.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and has just started developing software at Redwood Digital Research (RDR), a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment. RDR is based in Felton, California, USA.

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CrunchBang at SCALE 11X

One of the problems with working a show like the Southern California Linux Expo SCALE 11X is that I am “working the show,” meaning I don’t get out to see talks or the exhibit floor or much of what makes SCALE 11X the great show that it is. Being the publicity traffic cop that guides reporters to various speakers and exhibitors while posting scores of social media posts and web page updates leaves yours truly with time to do little else. This is not a complaint, but rather an excuse for not having a more comprehensive report from the show.

I did, however, get to lead the CrunchBang Birds of a Feather session — a meetup of the curious and those who use CrunchBang, held on Saturday evening. The gathering of about 20 people — no more than five who either have used or currently use CrunchBang (me excluded) — attended and after my short presentation, a discussion about the advantages of different window managers atop Debian (Openbox is still the general favorite), when Waldorf will become official (when Wheezy does), and other discussions about what tweaks one can do to their CrunchBang install.

Once again, because no one volunteered to staff the CrunchBang booth at SCALE 11X last weekend in Los Angeles, I had to withdraw it (as mentioned before, because I work for SCALE I couldn’t staff it). But CrunchBang was well represented anyway at SCALE 11X both through the Birds of a Feather session and Philip Banks’ item as part of his blog, “20 Days of SCALE.”

So looking ahead to other shows in North America, we’ll definitely be setting up shop in Bellingham, Washington, with a booth at Linux Fest Northwest at the end of April, where I’ve also submitted a talk about CrunchBang (the best distro you’ve never heard of). Then it’s off to Austin, Texas, for Texas Linux Fest at the end of May, with the remote — remote — possibility of my actually boarding a plane (providing government officials allow me to) and flying to Charlotte, North Carolina, for SELF — that’s SouthEast LinuxFest (Linux in the GNU South — always loved that motto!) in June.

If you’re going to one of these shows and you think you can put in some time at the CrunchBang table, e-mail me at lcafiero-at-lavabit-dot-com.

This blog, and all other blogs by Larry the Free Software Guy, Larry the CrunchBang Guy and Larry Cafiero, are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs CC BY-NC-ND license. In short, this license allows others to download this work and share it with others as long as they credit me as the author, but others can’t change it in any way or use it commercially.

Larry Cafiero is one of the founders of the Lindependence Project and has just started developing software at Redwood Digital Research (RDR), a consultancy that provides FOSS solutions in the small business and home office environment. RDR is based in Felton, California, USA.

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